Monday, November 30, 2015

A-4 Mountain Laurel Month 3

History and Details of the Original Block Row Four, Column  One, Sew Along Block 3 "This plant, a harbinger of Spring, grows wild in the Appalachian Mountains. The design "Laurel Leaves," especially with crossed stems, was a favorite of quilters in this part of the Valley during the mid-1800s." ...Neva Hart
Original Block in SVBAQ by Esther
History and Details of the Original Block
Row Four, Column  One, 
Sew Along Block 3

"This plant, a harbinger of Spring, grows wild in the Appalachian Mountains. The design "Laurel Leaves," especially with crossed stems, was a favorite of quilters in this part of the Valley during the mid-1800s." ...Neva Hart


The inked botanical name is found centered at the base of the crossed branches.

.I think it's interesting to see that Esther chose to quilt on top of her applique' work in addition to the echo quilting she did around the botanicals.  Notice that she used white thread, this was fairly common in early baltimore album style quilts.
Inking and Hand Quilting Stitches on Esther's Block
I think it's interesting to see that Esther chose to quilt on top of her applique' work in addition to the echo quilting she did around the botanicals.  Notice that she used white thread, this was fairly common in mid 19th century album style quilts.

Reproduction block - Doreen's 16" version

This is my 2 color version in fabric shades of Red & Taupe.  I used light & medium value taupe prints for the leaves and a darker linen/taupe solid for the stem work.  The buds were stitched in a small red print and the heart shaped blossoms from a "faded" red solid.

I am using a mix of hand applique' techniques in the quilt.  Allowing each block to dictate my methods of prep work and sewing.  Below is a mini outline of how I assembled this block.


Block Strategies and Assembly:


First I added the background leaves.  Next the buds and blossoms.  Then the crossing stem work and branches,  the left and then the right.  I treated the stem work as one piece, but you could add the smaller stems first and then the larger branch that connects them together.        (click on picture to enlarge it) 





To create the stem work, I traced the pattern onto freezer paper.  Cut it out and ironed it onto the RIGHT side of my fabric.  I used a white chalk pencil to trace around the edges of the paper, peeled off the freezer paper and then cut away the stemwork leaving an 1/8" seam allowance for needle turning under.




Are you just joining us?  We have traditional & modern applique' tutorials HERE.
Be sure to post pictures of your blocks on the facebook page HERE.
Please stop back on the 15th as we begin Show & Tell.... our favorite time of the month where we feature blocks made by quilting and blogging friends participating in this sew along.

HAPPY STITCHING!
Doreen & Dawn








10 comments:

  1. Beautiful! I hope to add mine soon! Thanks.

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    1. Thank you Wendy - I am really looking forward to seeing your finished block! I know it will be beautiful.

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    1. Thank you Deb!
      It will be exciting to see how you and other quilters work up this block.

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  3. Thanks for the assembly strategy - looks great ! lots of little short stems are a nuisance but you have such a lovely neat finish. Will get started asap :)

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  4. Thank you Hilda.
    This is my favorite block so far.
    Although, I will probably feel that way about a lot more of these blocks as I stitch them together.

    Happy Stitching!

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  5. I do my freezer paper the same as you, pressing it onto the right side of the fabric. Instead of drawing around it, I fold the fabric under right on the edge of the paper, then remove the paper. I find that I can still see the fold, and this eliminates having to mark. It works for me. I'm really enjoying the Sew Along, and am looking forward to starting this block.

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    1. What a great tip for freezer paper applique'!
      Thank you for sharing. There are so many clever techniques for applique work'. I really enjoy learning about how others prep their piecework.

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    2. Oh, and momzilla is me---Nancy Austin Swanwick.

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